Darius Goes West: Pre-screening thoughts

This entry originally appeared on my disability blog, I hate stairs.

I received my usual Friday email alert from The Reflector, Mississippi State’s newspaper. Since my brother is the Opinion Editor (you know, he edits writers’ opinions), I often check out the Opinion section to read the political-finding-of-self Lazarus Austin, the I-had-to-write-about-something-so-I-picked-this Matt Watson, and the satirical breath of fresh air, R.L. Scribner.

But today, I found hapiness in another Opinion writer. Bailey Singletary introduced me to a film called “Darius Goes West,” a film about a guy who has Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and travels from his home in Athens, GA on a cross-country trip to be on “Pimp My Ride.” There is going to be a screening here on campus at Lee Hall. From what I can tell Darius is going to be there, and he and his crew are going to take questions after showing the film.

The project is raising money for DMD research by selling DVDs for $20 each. Out of the twenty, $17 is for DMD research and the remaining $3 is used for making more DVDs. They are also taking donations as well.

It sounds like a great story and the film appears to be rather entertaining. I’ll know more next week. I know that some in the disability community do not like touchy-feely, sympathy-inducing stories about disabled people, espescially when used to raise money. But I don’t think this film is going to rub them the wrong way. I don’t think the focus of the film is going to be about how horrible his disability is, but rather about how life goes on and we make the best of it.

There has also been debate about cures. Some have said that they would not accept a cure because their disabilities help make up who they are. They don’t find cures to be the solution to the “problem.” It isn’t wrong to deny or accept a cure. Individuals have the right to make that decision for themselves. Personally, I would gladly accept a cure. Why? To be frank, my disability will kill me (all else equal). SMA is a progressive disease.

So I hope even the skeptical will give this film a chance, at least on the good chance that it will be entertaining. I’m planning on writing more about the film after the screening. Cheers.